The New Connecticut Uniform Power of Attorney Act: Part 3 – Authorities of the Agent

One of the many new features of the Connecticut Uniform Power of Attorney Act is the new authorities that the person creating the power of attorney (called the “principal”) may grant to someone else (called the “agent”). Technically, even before Connecticut’s new law was enacted, a power of attorney could be drafted to include many powers not in the statutory short or long form template. Most of these “new” powers are related to estate planning and asset management.

Under the new law, the agent may be given power to create, revoke or terminate a living trust. This provision can be useful to help in management of assets such as real property and bank accounts, as well as in estate planning.

In the realm of estate planning, the agent might also be granted the authority to disclaim property. With a disclaimer, someone who is entitled to receive property from an inheritance or as a named beneficiary in a life insurance policy, to name just two examples, could refuse to take that property. When that happens, the next person in line to receive the disclaimed property would be entitled to it. Disclaimers are often, but not exclusively used when a relative passes away leaving assets (such as a bank account or real estate) to their husband, wife, son, daughter, grandchildren, or someone else.

Another power that the agent might be granted is the authority to make gifts from the assets of the principal. For example, the principal may have a tradition of giving gifts to relatives at birthdays or holidays, or gifts for a specific purpose, such as college tuition. Authority to make gifts could allow the agent to continue these types of traditions, especially if the principal becomes incapacitated.

Changing rights of survivorship is another area that an agent might be granted authority. It’s common for real property, particularly residential real estate, to be owned in survivorship. One advantage of survivorship property is that upon the death of one of the owners, the remaining owner or owners would automatically receive the deceased owner’s share of the property without probate proceedings. However, probate applications would still be necessary in such a situation to obtain release of Connecticut estate or succession tax liens and release of lien for Connecticut probate fees.

Related to changing rights of survivorship is the authority to change beneficiary designations. Beneficiary designations operate in a similar way to survivorship, except that a beneficiary essentially has no right to the asset until the owner passes away. Life insurance policies and accounts in financial institutions are two examples of property that commonly has a beneficiary designation.

The new law provides for other powers that may be granted under a power of attorney.

For information and advice as to your particular situation, consult a qualified attorney who has experience with estate planning and powers of attorney.

THIS ARTICLE IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO BE, NOR SHOULD IT BE RELIED UPON, AS LEGAL ADVICE. CONSULT A QUALIFIED ATTORNEY FOR ADVICE REGARDING YOUR SITUATION.

COPYRIGHT 2016 DOMENICK N. CALABRESE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. COPYING, DISSEMINATION AND DISTRIBUTION WITHOUT THE EXPRESS WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE AUTHOR IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

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